New worksheet available! Stress LESS.

Hi everybody!

I have been scribbling different versions of this worksheet for some time now, and I finally have a version that I’m excited to share. It is the first in a series of worksheets that I will be making available on the (heyyyyy) WORKSHEETS PAGE!

 Me, being  not stressed  about being covered in Jell-o at my son’s 7th birthday party.  Yep, he still likes getting messy, I’ve just joined him.

Me, being not stressed about being covered in Jell-o at my son’s 7th birthday party. Yep, he still likes getting messy, I’ve just joined him.

This first worksheet is all about identifying your response to stressors. We all need LESS STRESS, and I am 100% sure you can shift your perception of your personal stressors (well, most of them anyway) to have less stress.

The basic idea is that you will identify your stressors. After you have identified your stressors, you can then have a real conversation with yourself about whether you choose to have a stress response to that or not. That’s right, you get to choose in more cases than not.

The example I always give in my clinic is when my son was about 2-3, he was obsessed with emptying all toothpaste, all dish soap, all shampoo, bubble bath, you name it..into the sink or the bath tub. We would be having a normal day, getting ready to leave the house and I’d realize that I sent him to get socks (or pants or whatever!), and he didn’t come back straight away. I would know that he was probably getting into something, and I’d feel this mild fury rise in me that he was wasting another tube of toothpaste. Even though the grownups had put it out of reach, my 5 year old probably hadn’t…..lo and behold a sink full of toothpaste AND toilet paper because he actually tried to clean it up. I was right, but I was in no place to acknowledge he was a little kid trying to learn. That moment sucked, and I wanted so much to have had a different response. It was predictable. He did it All. The. Time. He was an insatiable tiny mad scientist.

I had to learn to have a new response in that very moment. I had to decide that I would not allow myself to become stressed about wasted toothpaste. I had to decide that as I walked down the hall, rounding the corner to the bathroom, that I would take pause, assess the situation, and do my best to not allow this particular stressor become STRESS IN MY BODY. It was as simple as making a decision to respond differently. I use this example as a jumping off point. Other stressors may require more complex changes, but I’d highly recommend downloading the worksheet, and see just how many perceived stressors you can shift without embodying them anymore!